5 Comments

  1. teachwell
    June 25, 2015 @ 3:49 pm

    Reblogged this on The Echo Chamber.

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  2. thequirkyteacher
    June 27, 2015 @ 6:49 pm

    Just read this really good post, and completely agree. It must take some guts to talk about your own childhood circumstances (as it was for me).
    I like how you link emotion-led sympathy to the common rhetoric of the teacher as saviour, as you have solved a mystery to me as to why I was continuously fed the whole ‘You can make a child happy’ spiel during my training. I, too, think that there is far too much co-dependency going on and also agree that many teachers perhaps need to think about being social workers?

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  3. teachwell
    June 27, 2015 @ 8:52 pm

    Lol – I just think they would have messed me up!!! I think that there are many teachers who really are suited to babysitting as any kind of scenario which involves actual learning would be eschewed!! I was impressed by how you wrote about your childhood circumstances but I think that more people like us need to speak up. There are so many in education who are just making up what children in those circumstances want or need and it is just a figment of their imagination. It doesn’t actually deal with the problem, just creates a whole set of other ones for some counsellor to sort out when these children become adults!!! If they are fortunate enough to realise that they need one!

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