2 Comments

  1. Brian
    November 19, 2017 @ 8:50 am

    As a 59 year old white middle class male who has lived for 90% of my life in the UK, I don’t see those values as “British core values” myself. I do not think those values are necessarily values we should aspire to. I do not believe those values will allow us to function as a civilized society and I dont think they are the best that has been developed to date. Maybe that’s why I currently work and live outside of the UK.

    I am sure we should, as schools, be playing a role in helping kids in 2017 develop their identities with their own core values but for me imposing these 4 as the best we can do would stick in the throat just a bit.

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    • Teachwell
      November 19, 2017 @ 11:23 am

      Your first paragraph just demonstrates the importance of teaching those values. If you don’t know how rule of law and democracy allow us to function as civilised society then there is a knowledge gap. As a country, we have taken in plenty of refugees and asylum seekers who can attest to the dysfunction in their societies that is the result of the lack of these core values and ideas within the societies they have fled. Yes some of this is due to British foreign policy, but committing war is not part of the core values for a reason – it’s not one.

      “I am sure we should, as schools, be playing a role in helping kids in 2017 develop their identities with their own core values.”

      You seem to think that only identity leads to core values whereas the argument I am making is the core values would help us ensure a shared British identity. This is no different to other multiethnic societies – e.g. India, I give the example of Rwanda too. Who benefits from the kind of atomised and fragmented society you demonstrate a preference for? Well we can see already that it’s the extremists on all sides. A society tearing itself apart isn’t a good society.

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