Teachwell | Jeremy Corbyn’s Movement
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Jeremy Corbyn’s Movement

flickr photo by DavidMartynHunt https://flickr.com/photos/davidchief/405506730 shared under a Creative Commons (BY) license
flickr photo by DavidMartynHunt https://flickr.com/photos/davidchief/405506730 shared under a Creative Commons (BY) license

Jeremy Corbyn has tapped into the mood of those who see life as a perpetual protest. Those who are seeking conflict. Those whose sense of right and wrong depends on always being on the side of those who are in the ‘right’. This is conveniently defined by them and other righteous people who conveniently agree with them.

 

Already it is clear that Corbyn’s ‘welcome home’ statement was aimed at the old militants, the TUSC, Greens and those who voted UKIP. In addition, he is appealing to those who did not vote in the last election – the young in particular. There is even a shadow cabinet post dedicated to this.

 

This is Corbyn’s Labour, his grassroots movement, £3 Labour supporters, some who managed to stretch to full membership, the Trade Unions and the old Comrades. These voters, he and his movement are convinced, will win him the next general election (although this is not actually a requirement of the movement).

 

Those of us who voted for the other candidates should accept that we are ideologically impure if we think or believe anything different to the Corbynites. So far I have not been asked to enter Room 101, but then I am abroad.

 

So let me pledge to do the following before the rats are brought out:

 

  • I will stop spreading neo-liberal economic fears by questioning any aspect of Corbynomics.
  • In particular, I will not question what mechanisms will be used to control inflation.
  • I will not ask how long it will take before all the legal loopholes are closed to ensure that reinstating the 50% tax rate actually yields revenues to meet spending commitments.
  • I will not question whether, if this tax policy fails, it is a good idea to rely on printing money on an ongoing basis to meet year on year commitments.
  • I will not question Corbyn’s decision to pose and have pictures taken with young women clinging to him, looking like a Trotskyite Stringfellow, instead of talking to Andrew Marr.
  • I will not question the wisdom of giving all the high profile cabinet positions to men later on the same day.
  • I will not question if creating shadow cabinet posts for posts that don’t exist in the actual cabinet so he doesn’t appear sexist was worth it.
  • I will not question if it is hypocritical for someone who has voted against his own party on over 500 occasions to appoint a chief whip.
  • I will not question those who have decided that it was ok for Corbyn to rebel because he was always part of small-scale rebellions, whereas the current MPs who don’t support him would be doing it on a large scale.
  • I will not ask if it’s true that Corbyn rebelled to represent the ‘true’ Labour values whereas backbenchers now would only be doing it to spite Corbyn so are wrong. Wrong I say.
  • I will not question whether it is total hypocrisy to express high levels of disloyalty to one’s own party and leader yet expect loyalty once you have become a leader.
  • I will not question the understanding of British or Labour Party politics of any member of the movement (I understand my bourgeois MPhil in Political Science and thesis on the Labour Party means nothing in the face of the movement’s understanding of the Labour Party’s true history. I expect a copy of this will be available from all good bookshops soon.)
  • I will not point out to any member of the movement that they are acting like the pigs in Orwell’s Animal Farm or that the totalitarianism in 1984 represented the communists and the fascists.

 

I get it, I do. Those of us who backed the other candidates should do, believe and think what the movement now tells us to. If not, we should join the Conservatives because we are Tory scum after all.

 

So the movement actually want over 200 000 Labour members, supporters and union voters to vote for the Conservatives instead? Sorry, old habits. *Slaps wrist* Must not question the movement, must not question the movement, must not question…

 

This post was originally published on the Labour Teachers website.

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